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Martin Luther, Reformer and his Augustinian Framework…

May 28, 2016

…’Upon analysis, it becomes clear that the best framework through which to analyze the great Reformer is the Augustinian framework. St. Augustine taught the doctrine of double predestination. That he believed God predestined not only the salvation of His elect, but also the reprobation of the wicked is clear:

“Therefore the mercy is past finding out by which He has mercy on whom He will, no merits of his own preceding; and the truth is unsearchable by which He hardeneth whom He will, even although his merits may have preceded, but merits for the most part common to him with the man on whom He has mercy. As of two twins, of which one is taken and the other left, the end is unequal, while the deserts are common, yet in these the one is in such wise delivered by God’s great goodness, that the other is condemned by no injustice of God’s. For is there unrighteousness with God? Away with the thought!”(Augustine/Luther)

Augustine clearly taught that from eternity God predestined those whom He would save and those whom He would not. In writing against the Pelagian heretics of his day, Augustine was prolific in his treatment of divine predestination. He taught that the Sovereignty of God was so great that even the hearts and wills of wicked men are directly controlled by God Himself.’ (Brian Mattson)

 

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2 Comments
  1. Theologically Luther seems to be easily pressed to the so-called double predestination position! Though he might not have pressed all of his own followers here, such as Melanchton. And see too his debates with Erasmus on the battle over Free Will. Surely Luther believed and taught “bound choice” for all believers!

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